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New Collegeville Bible Commentary - NT + NABRE

Comprehensive and understandable, the New Collegeville Bible Commentary brings expert insight into the New Testament to Bible study participants, teachers, students, preachers, and all readers of the Bible. Filled with fresh scholarship, the series provides vital background that helps bring the text alive.

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Comprehensive and understandable, the New Collegeville Bible Commentary brings expert insight into the New Testament to Bible study participants, teachers, students, preachers, and all readers of the Bible. Filled with fresh scholarship, the series provides vital background that helps bring the text alive.

This is a fine series that will be a great help to the Catholic community and deserves to have a long shelf life.
The Bible Today

This New Collegeville Commentary will encourage an informed and responsible Christian community in every parish.
Prairie Messenger

What's Included

This New Testament collection includes the following titles:

New American Bible, Revised Edition + Study Notes

The NABRE is a formal equivalent translation of Sacred Scripture, sponsored by the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, using the best manuscripts available. Work on most books of the Old Testament by forty revisers and a board of eight editors began in 1994 and was completed in 2001. The 1991 revision of the Psalter, the work of thirty revisers and six editors, was further revised by seven revisers and two editors between 2009 and 2010. Work on the New Testament, begun in 1978 and completed in 1986, was the work of thirteen revisers and five editors. 

New Testament

Volume 1: Matthew

The Gospel of Matthew carries important lessons on the formation of community and of Jesus as authoritative Teacher--lessons that helped the early Matthean population relate to both the Jewish and Christian communities of which they were composed.

The Gospel According to Matthew provides Gospel text (New American Bible translation) along with Barbara E. Reid's commentary, to aid in the interpretation and use of this Gospel today. As Reid demonstrates, this Gospel continues to bring vision and hope to Christians throughout the ages.

Reid stresses the importance of the Gospel of Matthew as the first book in the New Testament, possibly the first written Gospel, and the one most often used in the early church. Providing both the text and commentary, Reid addresses important questions such as the author's identity and sources, setting and Gospel translation.

Volume 2: Mark

The absence of stories of Jesus' birth and infancy, a minimum of Jesus' parables and a resurrection scene without sight or sound of the risen Jesus have tempted readers to shortchange Mark's Gospel. Thanks to the insightful analysis and inspiring reflections of Marie Noonan Sabin, anyone studying this premier Gospel with her guidance will recognize the genius of the original author.

Sabin asserts that Mark's Gospel is not an eyewitness account or a work of biography or history. She writes, "What Mark gives us is far richer. He interprets Jesus in the light of the Hebrew Bible, showing Jesus to be not only a teacher of Wisdom but Wisdom itself, calling his followers to an unconventional wisdom, a way of living (and a way of dying) that he himself exemplifies."

Volume 3: Luke

Luke continues to challenge our lives. Focusing on Jesus and his earthly ministry among the early church, Michael, F. Patella, OSB, opens the Gospel of Luke to the 21st-century reader.

Patella presents literary, textual, and historical criticism in a readable manner to give readers a solid background for the Lukan Gospel. A brief introduction informs reader of Luke's literary technique, Luke as an evangelist, and other historical data.

Volume 4: The Gospel According to John and the Johannine Letters

Thought-provoking and understandable, Scott M. Lewis, SJ, breaks the Gospel of John down into manageable sections with commentary vital to new and returning readers. Using themes from John's prologue to provide a focus, Lewis encourages his readers to question and ponder, rather than gloss over, this deceptively simple text.

Volume 5: Acts

Dennis Hamm stresses the unity between the Acts of Apostles and the Gospel of Luke. His section-by-section commentary (along with New American Bible translation), based on the best of recent scholarship, will appeal to teachers, preachers and Bible study groups with its non-technical, yet scholarly style.

Hamm helps visualize Christianity's growth from Jewish roots and the Church as continuation of God's covenant with Israel. Paying close attention to the use of the Old Testament. Hamm demonstrates how the Acts of the Apostles--first addressed to the early Christian community--speaks to our generation today.

Volume 6: Galatians, Romans

In his thorough, yet concise commentary on Galatians and Romans, Robert Karris, O.F.M. encourages his readers to take a head on approach to reading and interpreting the biblical text. He discusses form and purpose, message, and basic outline to help readers understand Galatians and Romans.

With his section-by-section commentary, Karris offers readers of all backgrounds further opportunity to study and reflect on the books of Galatians and Romans.

Volume 7: First and Second Corinthians

What was originally part of an ongoing dialogue between Paul and the community at Corinth has become vital in today's Christian worship. Maria A. Pascuzzi, CSJ, helps us look at the Corinthian community through Paul's viewpoint, highlighting the struggles and issues of the Corinthian society. Pascuzzi highlights how Paul's attempt to reform this early society can be used to refocus the Christian community today-a community that faces similar struggles.

Pascuzzi gives the background of Corinth, its Greek and Roman inhabitants, the development of the Christian community, and the importance of Corinth's location to Paul's ministry.

Volume 8: Thessalonians, Philippians, Ephesians, Colossians

Vincent M. Smiles provides a fresh look at the early Church and the faith with which they approached their dynamic, diverse community. With a brief introduction to each letter, Smiles brings to light issues such as authorship, dating, and historical situation. Smiles focuses on similarities and contrasts-such as eschatology, ecclesiology and the status of women--within these diverse, yet unified letters.

A reading of these letters as "partners in a conversation" provides both an understanding and inspiration for today's Christian society: inspiration to meet our challenges in faith with the same creativity as did the early Church.

With an understandable, yet comprehensive manner, this commentary will appeal to those interested in the changing early Church and its ancient wisdom.

Volume 9: Timothy, Titus, Philemon

First and Second Timothy and Titus are designated Pastoral Letters because they deal with leadership and organizational issues of the early Christian community. Probably written after the death of Paul, they nevertheless express what Paul himself would have and could have written to community leaders. Second Timothy gives the greatest amount of biographical material we have about Paul. The Letter to Philemon, a miniature but authentic Pauline jewel, is a masterpiece of persuasion regarding a slave’s freedom.

Terence J. Keegan’s perceptive commentaries on these precious remnants of first century Christianity provide information and insight regarding the gradual growth of the church. There are pertinent lessons here for today’s shepherds and their flocks.

Volume 10: James, Peter, Jude

Who would not relish the opportunity to read two-thousand-year-old letters? These four of the seven "catholic letters" are addressed not to any specific church, as are Paul's epistles, but to the church in general. Giving us valuable insights into early Christianity, they insist on the need to join good works with faith, present Jesus' sufferings as the model for enduring persecution and warn against intruders intent on undermining traditional faith and morals.

Far from being mere exercises in nostalgia for the "good ol' days," the letters offer principles that have not lost their value for the Church of the third millennium.

Patrick Hartin's clarity and conciseness update the Church's earliest struggles to remain faithful to the spirit of Jesus Christ. These are letters for us today, too.

Volume 11: Hebrews

When is a letter not a letter? When it is the Letter to the Hebrews. Daniel J. Harrington describes this text as "the greatest Christian sermon ever preached or written" and its author as "the patron saint of preachers." The basic theological point of the sermon is that Christ is both the perfect sacrifice for sins and the priest who offers himself as a sacrifice.

The anonymous author of this work addresses Jewish Christians who had embraced Christianity with enthusiasm but were becoming discouraged and falling away in the face of suffering. The biblical text and Harrington's uncomplicated commentary are ideal components for individual and group study. Reading and reflection will produce a renewed appreciation of the saving work of Jesus.

Volume 12: Revelation

Full of awesome and gruesome scenes that seem to provoke more fear than faith, the Book of Revelation is often read as a roadmap through the doom and gloom of the end time. Correctly understood, however, this grand finale of the New Testament is a loud and clear call to conversion as well as a message of hope and consolation for Christians of every age.

Catherine Cory carefully explains the variety of visions that unfold in kaleidoscopic fashion throughout the book. Scenes from the Old Testament form collages that convey the central theme; namely, that God is in control and evil is being conquered. The breathtaking conclusion resounds with God's promise, "Behold, I make all things new."

Cory's lucid style reveals the true message of the Book of Revelation.

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New Collegeville Bible Commentary - NT + NABRE

New Collegeville Bible Commentary - NT + NABRE

Comprehensive and understandable, the New Collegeville Bible Commentary brings expert insight into the New Testament to Bible study participants, teachers, students, preachers, and all readers of the Bible. Filled with fresh scholarship, the series provides vital background that helps bring the text alive.

Write a review